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Legislative Assembly of Prince Edward Island, 26 May 1873, Prince Edward Island Confederation with Canada.

1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 195

MONDAY, May 26th.

196 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873
House in Committee to consider the despatches relating to Confederation.
MR. HOWATT in the chair.
Hon. LEADER OF THE GOVERNMENT said that since he submitted the resolution before the Committee, he had received from the Finance Minister a correct copy of the resolution passed on the same question, by the Dominion Parliament, and as it was necessary that the resolution passed by this House should be similar in every respect, he would ask leave to withdraw the resolution now before the Committee, and substitute the Dominion resolution.
Hon. COL. SECRETARY said that the resolution passed by this House on the question now before the Committee, should be identical with that passed by the Parliament of Canada. When the delegates were in Ottawa, a Minute of Council was drawn up in rather a hurry, and the Law Clerk of the House of Commons found it was necessary to extend it in certain particulars in order to make it sufficiently clear, but its principles were not changed in any respect.
MR. BEER said that there had been a good deal of thimble-rigging on the part of a certain hon. member in the morning, he wished, in order to prevent a misunderstanding, to hear the resolution read.
Hon. COL. SECRETARY said that if the hon. member's language referred to any hon. member of that House, his words should be taken down.
Hon. LEADER OF THE GOVERNMENT.—The hon. member for Southport talked about thimble-rigging. If any hon. member of that House knew any other hon. member to be guilty of falsifying, or altering any documents belonging to the Legislature, and did not immediately expose such conduct, he was just as guilty as if he had himself committed the offence. The hon. member had, in the morning, accused his hon. colleague of altering some document, and if he was sincere in his charge, it was his duty to bring the matter properly before the House while the Speaker was in the chair ; but he had no right to refer to it when the House was in Committee.
The resolution submitted by the hon. Leader of the Government was then, according to the request of the hon. member for Southport, read by the Chairman.
Hon. LEADER OF THE GOVERNMENT said he supposed the Committee was satisfied to allow him to withdraw the resolution first submitted, and substitute the one just read. He would, when this was disposed of, submit another in reference to the Electoral districts, into which the Island shall be divided for the election of members to the Dominion House of Commons. As the matter now before the Committee had been pretty fully discussed, and as there would probably be a good deal of discussion upon the next resolution which would be introduced, he would move that the resolution be agreed to.
MR. D. LAIRD seconded the motion of his honor the Leader of the Government, and said that the slight alteration in the wording of the resolution now before the Committee, would make it considerably clearer, without changing its principles. Our election laws would remain the same ; the only change in reference to the Dominion elections, would be the division of the Island into larger districts.
MR. CALLBECK had opposed the resolution authorizing the appointment of the last delegation to Ottawa, because he was satisfied with the Terms first brought down, and had been 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 197 elected by the people to accept them, and to carry out Confederation with the Dominion ; but as still better Terms had been obtained by the last delegation, he would support the reso1ution. The Haythorne-Laird Terms had been submitted to the supporters of the late Government, and as he approved of them, he ran his election upon them, and his action was endorsed by his constituents. It would, in his opinion, have been a breach of faith on his part with the Government of the Dominion, if, on being elected to vote for the Terms first brought down, he had voted for the resolution asking the appointment of a second delegation for the purpose of seeking better Terms. After endorsing the Terms then before the country to the extent of running an election upon them, the present Opposition were morally bound to support their adoption by the Legislature. The last delegation had brought fresh Terms, and its action had relieved him of the moral ties which held him in his former position, so that he was now at liberty to exercise his judgment and vote upon the question as he thought proper. The Terms obtained by Messrs. Haythorne and Laird, were, he believed, very good, and it was his opinion, that no other delegation would, at that time, if sent upon that mission, have secured better Terms. The last delegation had had an advantage over the first, and they have also done their duty. Both delegations were well entitled to the approbation and thanks of that hon. House, as both had done their very best for the interests of this Island. The first delegation was generally thought to have obtained as good Terms as the Dominion could afford to allow this Colony, and how the extra sum had been secured he could not understand, except that it was through the anxiety of that Government to induce us to enter the union. The latter reason may have justified them in giving us an additional grant, which, in his opinion, we shall find none too large for the necessities of this Colony. But it is more probable that the Dominion Government intend increasing the allowance to the other Provinces by a re-adjustment of their several debts to the extent of an additional $5 per head of their populations. If so, our gain from the increased allowance will not be so large as it would otherwise be. Be this as it may, he felt justified in giving the resolution his hearty support.
MR. McNEILL had previously given his views upon this great question of Confederation. As both sides of the House now entertained similar opinions on the matter, it could scarcely be called a party question. The necessity for our accepting the Terms now before us was admitted by every hon. member of the House, with the exception of Mr. Chairman and his hon. colleague, who were still of opinion that we could manage our own affairs better than the Dominion will do it for us ; but he (Mr. McN.) believed even they would see, before the question was taken, that the best course we could pursue, would be to cast in our lot with the great Dominion. When the Railway Bill was passed, he believed it would land us in Confederation, but did not think we should have to go in quite so soon. He thought that the money expended in the construction of the Railroad would supply sufficient exchange to enable us to meet the demands upon the Colony, but his expectations had not been verified. The late Government found so many, and such great difficulties to contend with, that they found it necessary, before matters went too far, to send up a delegation to Ottawa, for the purpose of ascertaining what Terms the Dominion Government were willing to offer us for our accept 198 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 ance. He gave both delegations credit for the manner in which they negociated with the Canadian Government in obtaining the best possible Terms that could be secured for this Island. The Terms brought down by Messrs. Haythorne and Laird were considered at the time as extremely favorable, considering the circumstances of the country. The people, to a certain extent, had prepared themselves for going into Confederation, and the Terms were fully as good, or perhaps better than they expected. As they now see that it is a necessity, they accept the situation quietly, but solemnly. As regarded himself and his constituents, they regretted being placed in such a position that it was necessary to give up the coastitution of the Colony as a separate Province. He, himself, felt sorry to think that we were about to give tip self-government, after maintaining out position as a Colony with an independent Legislature, for one hundred years. The Island was originally separated from Nova Scotia through the influence of the proprietors who wished to get clear of the Court of Escheat, then established in that Province, but as that Court was not now in existence, they wished to get us into the Dominion. Perhaps the step we are about to take will prove a good one after all, and the host that can be taken under present circumstances. Both delegations had done their very best for the Colony, but the last one had not shown clearly the basis upon which it obtained the Terms now before the Committee. If the $5 have been obtained upon the basis of a readjustment of the debts of the several Provinces of the Dominion, the additional sum will not prove as great a boon as ifobtnincd upon other grounds. The hon. junior member for Belfast had been accused of saying a good many hard things against the statesmen of the Dominion; but he (Mr. McN.) believed that the latter had also said a good many unpleasant things against that hon. member. The hon. jun. member for Belfast had, probably, never said as much against the statesmen of the Dominion as the latter had said against each other, and it was, therefore, highly probable that all those ill-feelings would be forgotten when this Colony forms a part of the great Dominion. He thought the additional Terms had been obtained more through the impertunity ofthe delegates, than through any particular line of argument. In whatever way the additional sum has been secured to this Colony, we should be glad that it has been granted us. One of the most. important concessions in the Terms is that the Dominion agrees to assume our Railway debt, and to work the Railway at its own expense. Whether we should be obliged to remain in the Dominion, if Canada at any time refused to sustain the Railway and keep it in working order, he did not know. He thought the Dominion should be bound to replace the sleepers when required, and to run the Railway. He supposed the time was come for us to give up our separate Government, and that. we should bow to what he hoped would ultimately prove to be for our benefit. He did not wish to take up much of the time o! the House, as it was necessary that country members should soon return to their homes, but he had to state that he gave up our separate Government, as a Colony, with regret. We were giving up the power of taxation, and in return would in his opinion, receive little benefit from the public works of the Dominion. There was no doubt that we would receive a present benefit by accepting Confederation; but he believed we should be losers in the end. A little branch line of Railway had been asked for Port Hill, which had not been granted, but he hoped before long a short branch would be built to Rustico. There was no longer any 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 199 doubt that the Railway will never be a paying affair in this little Island, as we haVe no connection by land with any other country. He did not believe that the road Would ever pay the interest of the money expended 'in its construction, and this was the principal reason why he would support a measure to hand over our little Island to the Dominion of Canada. If the present offer was not accepted, he behaved we should fare worse than if included in the Dominion. One circumstance gave him much to hope for. We belong to the great continent of America, and it was probable that before long a uhion would take place between the Dominion of Canada and the United States ofAmerica, if so, we should yet form a part of one of the greatest nations in the world.
Hon. Mr. SULLIVAN thought he would have had an opportunity of making a few remarks before the debate had arrived at that stage, but was prevented, owing to the fact that the time had been so completely occupied. It was satisfactory to know, that, after all the discussion and rambling remarks made by hon. members, the resolution would be almost unanimously passed by the Committee. Some eavillipg had been made about the Terms now before the Committee, and some hon. members had endeavored to show that they were little better than those brought down by Messrs. Haythorne and Laird. Certain hon. members of the Opposition were not satisfied, because, as they asserted, no basis had been shown as to the manner in which the Terms had been obtained. This was, in his opinion, a matter in which the country took little or no interest, as long as the Terms were fair and reasonable, and such as we might with confidence accept. The hon. member for Murray Harbor stated there was reason to believe that the additional $5 per head was obtained on the basis of a re-arrangement of the assumed debts of the other Provinces of the Dominion. He (Mr. S.) could not agree with that hon. member as the Terms plainly state that it has been allowed this Colony, in consideration of the large expenditure authorized by the Parliament of Canada for the construction of Railways and Canals, as well as our isolated and exceptional condition. We shall receive the sum of $50 per head till the rearrangement takes place, which may be some years hence. The hon. Leader of the Opposition seemed to be dissatisfied because the delegates had not shown as clearly as he wished, the reasons they advanced before. the Privy Coun. oil for the additional allowance. The former delegates asked for $56 per head. and received $45, while the latter delegates asked for $51 per head. and received $50. If the last delegation could not show a satisfactory basis for their claim of $51 per head, how could Messrs. Haythorne and Laird show good reason for their claim of $58 per head ? I think the Terms now before us must satisfy all parties; and the people generally will accept them as fair and reasonable to this Colony. There is nothing left, therefore, to prevent a speedy consummation of the union ofthe Island with the Dominion of Canada. He (Mr. S.) had not, till lately, been in favor of Confederation, but he agreed with the hon. member for Rustico, that, under present circumstances, there was no use in our fighting against it. There was every reason to believe that we should never regret, in the future, of having cast in our lot with the great Dominion. Both delegations had, in his opinion. done their best to obtain as liberal Terms as possible. A good deal of praise was due to the hon. junior member for Belfast for his long and persistent opposition to Confederation, as it had been the means of enabling us to make a better bargain.
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If that hon. member and other anti- Confederates had agreed to accept the Terms offered in 1864, he believed we would not now be in possession of as favorable Terms as those now before the Committee. A great deal has been gained by resisting Confederation so long as we had, but as we had now obtained fair and reasonable Terms, we should be satisfied to accept them with good grace. Our entrance into the Dominion would, to a very great extent, be the means of settling old party differences and questions which should, long ago, have been allowed to die out. If so, Confederation would prove a great boon to this Colony.
MR. BEER had canvassed his district as a Confederate, and had been returned to that House to support the Terms brought down from Ottawa by Messrs. Haythorne and Laird. He had voted against the resolution to appoint another delegation, because he believed that no better Terms than those then before the country, could be obtained ; and was still of opinion that be had good reason for acting as he did. The wording of that resolution was such that he could not vote for it, without violating the principles upon which he was elected. He could not promise to ratify whatever Terms the delegation, appointed by the present Government chose to negociate. The last delegates had done well in obtaining an additional sum of $25,000. He would have been glad to have seen that amount doubled, but we should be satisfied with the handsome sum which had been secured. It was not probable that any additional concession would be made to this Colony for a long time to come, as we had been liberally dealt with by the Government of the Dominion. Of all the Lighthouses, Drill Sheds, Breakwaters, &c., mentioned by his honor the Leader of the Gorernment, before setting out for Ottawa, as public works for the construction of which we had a good claim upon the Dominion, not one was mentioned by the delega:tes in their negociations with the Privy Council, proving that they did not base their claims on the omissions of the former delegates. Before the last delegation was appointed, it was rumored that the Government intended to ask the Dominion Government to allow us to retain the Railway, that we might work it ourselves. He could not support a resolution which empowered the delegates to negociate terms upon those grounds, because he believed the Railway would prove a losing affair for years to come. He was well pleased with the action of the delegates in obtaining the increased allowance, and would support the resolution before the Committee.
MR. SINCLAIR thought the hon. member for Rustico should heartily support the resolution, because Confederation would be the means of putting an end to the much vexed Land Question and Tenant League troubles. If anything would secure free lands for the people of this Colony, it was Confederation, as the Terms amply provided for the purchase of the proprietory estates. He believed that this Island would improvejn its agricultural, commercial and fishing operations, at a more rapid rate than it ever had done, and that general prosperity would be the result. The Colony would occupy a better financial position than ever before, as it would be entirely free from debt, and would receive a sufficient Revenue to meet its requirements for many years to come. Our prosperity would not be caused by the amount we shall receive from the Dominion, but on account of our being relieved from financial embarassment, and from our enjoyment of free 1873  PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 201 and unrestricted intercourse and trade. with the neighboring Provinces. For these, and other reasons, which he would not now stop to give, he would support the resolution submitted by his honor the Leader of the Government.
Hon. Mr. LEFURGY was proud to say that Confederation was at last about to be carried by an almost unanimous vote of that hon. House. Even the two hon. members for Bedeque, would be hoped, drop their opposition, and give the measure their hearty support. In adopting its present course, the House of Assembly was, he believed, carrying out the wishes of a very large majority of the people of this Colony. There were some localities, very probably, the people of which would rather retain their self government, but they would ultimately see and feel the benefit of unrestricted intercourse with the Dominion. Canada was destined to be a great country, and there was no doubt we should enjoy our share of her commerce, and that our wealth and material prosperity would increase with hers. He believed that the district which he represented would bear him out in the course which he was then pursuing, as the people now saw that Confederation would benefit this Colony in every way. During his canvass at the late election, he had pledged himself to endeavor to obtain better Terms than those then before the country, and he had now fulfilled his promise to his constituents. He was glad that [the delegates had obtained better Terms, and that the Opposition had heartily accepted them, although they did, at first, make some little objection to them on the ground that the basis upon which the Terms had been obtained was not made quite clear enough by the hon. members who formed the delegation . As we had received the guarantee that an additional sum would be conceded to us, it did not make much difference what arguments had been advanced in order to obtain it. Including certain sums promised by the Dominion Government, for the conveyance of mails by inland steam communication, the additional amount obtained by the last delegation was $33,000, which was a very handsome sum, and would prevent our being forced to resort to local taxation as soon as we otherwise would. As this was but a small Colony, we should endeavor to elect six good men to represent our interests in the Dominion House of Commons ; if we did this, our affairs would not be neglected. We shall go into the Dominion with a large number of people ; and he believed she would deal liberally with us. He would, with much pleasure, support the resolution, as he felt confident that under Confederation our affairs would be conducted in a far better and more satisfactory manner than ever before, and that all our little bickerings and old party differences would be forgotten. Some of our foremost statesman would be taken away from our local Legislature to represent as in the House of Commons, and others would take their places ; but he hoped and believed all would result in a happy and prosperous career for our littlle Island. (Cheers.)
MR. ROWE said that the question now before the Committee was one of the most important that ever occupied the attention of the Legislature of this Colony, as we were now about to resign the constitution under which we had lived, and under which the Island had enjoyed a separate government for the last one hundred years. He had to confess that he approached the question with mingled feelings of regret and pleasure. No doubt many hon. members of that house had looked forward to the time when they should 202 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 assist in carrying out that great question of Confederation, expecting, thereby, that they would forward their own personal interests. Others may have had the interests of the country, generally at heart, in assisting to bring this measure to completion, and, therefore, deserved well of their fellow Colonists. He had, as was well known, taken his stand in opposition to Confederation, but he had, in obedience to the wishes of the people of the Murray Harbor district, sunk his own individual opinions in reference to this question, and was prepared to give a willing support to the resolution. He believed that his constituents would not have gone in favor of the measure, were it not for circumstances over which they had no control. Indeed, he had reason to believe that his constituents regretted the circumstances which had placed them in their present position, and necessitated their acceptance of the Terms of Confederation now offered this Colony. Had it not been for the introduction of the Railway Bill, his constituency, and he believed other constituencies also, would still have rejected any offer Canada might make to this Colony to induce us to unite with her, as the peeple would have preferred to manage their own affairs as in times past. But there is, under our present circumstances, a necessity for our accepting Terms of Confederation, in order to escape financial embarassment. Great credit was due the former delegates who undertook to negociate Terms of union with Canada, when they saw the inevitable consequences of the Railway policy, they must have had a considerable amount of moral courage to have faced the danger as they did, knowing that a large number of the people of this Island were averse to Confederation. They opened up the ground for our receiving fair and reasonable Terms at the hands of the Dominion Government ; but they did not cover the whole of it. Another delegation has been sent to Ottawa, clothed with greater authority, and has obtained still further concessions from the Dominion. Whether the present Terms are an absolute advance over the former Terms, time will probably reveal ; he hoped they would prove to be so. In the Minute of Conference, he found a statement to the effect that the additional $5 was obtained " in view of the possibility of a re-adjustment of the financial arrangements between Canada and the several Provinces now embraced in the Dominion." It seemed to him that each of the other Provinces would also receive a like amount per head of its population. The force of the language contained in the Minute of Conference rested on the force of the word "possibility." Who would dare to say that the Dominion Government did not possess sufficient power to re-adjust the financial arrangements with its several Provinces, and give the $5 per head all round? The extra sum now granted this Colony, will be an absolute boon, until the other Provinces receive a similar amount in addition to their present allowances ; but when it is granted them, we shall have to contribute our proportion of the whole, and our real gain will then be very small indeed. The $2000 granted annually for telegraphic communication, will be a direct advantage to this Colony, and he was willing to accord to the last delegation due credit in obtaining an additional amount from the Dominion whether it amounted to $25,000 or $2,000 only. There was every reason to believe that we should require every cent of the amount we would receive from the Deminion. The hon. Leader of the Government and the hon. Attorney General seemed surprised that the Opposition did not accept their view 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 203 of the Terms new offered this Colony. The first delegation was in a similar position, a few weeks ago, in reference to the Government. The Opposition were willing to accept the words of the Canadian Ministry and Lord Dufferin, when they said that no better Terms could possibly be granted this Island. The Government side of the House treated the statement in question with apparent disrespect, but they now came down and expected the Opposition to accept Terms which hear an entirely different construction, without expressing any doubt as to the basis upon which the additional allowance is granted. He most heartily accorded all due credit to the last delegation for the additional amount they had secured to this Colony, and would most cordially support the resolution before the Committee, in the interests of his constituents, and of the people of the whole Island.
Hon. Mr. McEACHEN had, like Mr. Chairman himself, for many years fought the battle of anti-Confederation ; but he had never been one of those who strongly abused the Canadian Ministry, for the part they had taken in endeavoring to bring about a union of this Island with the Dominion. He had always considered them men of whom every true Briton might feel proud. It had been his honest conviction that we could do for ourselves, better in every way, than Canada could do for us ; but our affairs had now become so much changed that it was to our interest to accept with good grace the Terms now offered us by the Dominion. There was no reason to believe that our interests would suffer by entering the Dominion, to such a degree, as some people imagined. Some hon. members of the Opposition did not seem willing to accept the improved Terms, because they could not understand clearly the basis upon which they were obtained. They must certainly feel that this is a rich Colony, if they suppose that it can afford to throw aside so large an amcunt of money, merely because they cannot see how it has been secured to us. He had full confidence in the last delegation, and from the first believed that they would procure better Terms because they had more financial ability, and knew better how to present their claims than the former delegation. He would willingly support the resolution.
The question was then put, and the resolution carried unanimously.
Hon. LEADER OF THE GOVERNMENT said that before an Address to Her Majesty the Queen was passed, it was necessary that the electoral districts, into which this Island should be divided for the purpose of choosing representatives to send to the Dominion House of Commons, should be defined. It would be necessary to set forth in that Address the bounds of the six electoral districts, according to the terms of the British North America Act. As one of the representatives of Queen's County in that House, he thought that County fairly entitled to a much larger representation than either of the outlying Counties. But, in whatever way this matter was viewed, there were serious difficulties to contend with. Before long an additional member of the House of Commons will be allowed this Island, as the representation is based on that of the province of Quebec, from which thousands of people are emigrating every year to Manitoba, where land is abundant and cheap. The population of Quebec will increase at a slower rate than that of the other provinces and the consequence will be that the latter will, the sooner, receive an increase of representation, it will upset the whole arrangement, whereas, by taking the present County divisions as 204 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 electoral districts, the additional member could be given to Queen's County. All the arguments used by the delegates sent from this Island to the Quebec Conference, in reference to our representation in the House of Commons, were to the effect that two members should be allowed each County. When the hon. Leader of the Opposition went up to Ottawa on his late mission, he asked that two members be allowed as the representation of each County. It was probable the hon. member still held the same opinions in reference to this matter, as at that time. There will, probably, be two senators appointed for Queen's County, and one for each of the other Counties, which will, to a certain extent, equalize the representation. In Montreal East, the population represented by one member is seventeen thousand, and in St. John County, N. B., fifty-five thousand. Representation by population is not carried out in detail in the several Provinces, although each Province returns the number of representatives to which its population entitles it. There are members in the Dominion Parliament who represent only some 200 or 300 voters, while others represent more than 30,000. There is no satisfactory way in which an additional member can be allotted to any particular portion of this Island, except by allotting one to Queen's County under the proposed arrangement, making each County an electoral district, which shall return two members. Queen's County, will, no doubt, be able to return two members who will be a match for any other two returned by the outlying Counties. The people should take care to return gentlemen able to exercise a pretty strong influence in the Dominion Parliament, in order that their interests may be served in the best possible manner. The only battle that will be fought by our representatives in the House of Commons will be to obtain, each for his own district, as large a share of the monies granted for local improvements, as possible. In our representation in the Dominion Parliament, there will be no sectional interests, and probably no party lines. He hoped to see out representatives in the House of Commons stand shoulder to shoulder for the interests of this Island and those of the Maritime Provinces as well. If this principle is fully carried out, we shall secure our share of the monies granted for local works. The Parliament and people of Canada have a large, rich country, full of resources, and not half developed, and, therefore, look upon this Island as a very small place, still they earnestly desire to have us united with them, as we are a thriving people, and possess a fertile and prosperous country. Numbers of Canadians will find their way down here in the summer season, as they take a deep interest in our little Island, and have always manifested a disposition to deal liberally with us. He was satisfied we should have our full share of influence in the Dominion Parliament, and that we should receive justice at its hands. As we would have no local sectional interests to be represented in the House of Commons, he could not see any objection to giving each County an equal representation, with the understanding that when the increase of population entitles this Island to an additional representative, he shall be allotted to Queen's County.
I.O.
Mr. LAIRD maintained that as our population had increased fifteen thousand since the date of the Quebec Scheme, an additional representative in the Commons had been allowed to Prince Edward Island, on the principle of increased population. Therefore 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 205 that it is the duty of the Legislature to divide the districts for the representation in the Commons, on the basis of population, and not by Counties, and would test the question by submitting the following amendment:—
Resolved, That the districts for the representation of this Island in the House of Commons, of the Dominion, be six in number, each district returning one member ; and that the said districts be bounded so as to carry out the principle of representation by population, as nearly as the sub-divisions of Townships, Towns and Royalties will admit.
Hon. Mr. HAVILAND, admitted the principle was recognized in the North America Act, but denied that it was carried into effect, when the division of Provinces into electoral districts was carried out in detail.
Mr. L. H. DAVIES would like to see some well-defined, principle laid down. A division by Counties was unfair. It was unjust, to say that King's County should have the same representation as Queen's. Queen's County, to a large extent, represented the weath and intelligence of the whole Island. Some respect should be paid to Charlottetown, containing as it does such a large proportion of the wealth, population, and intelligence of the Island. He would second the amendment of the hon. member for Belfast.
Hon. Mr. BRECKEN said the division of the districts in Quebec are the same as they were before Confederation took place. If two representatives go from each County, they will have more influence. It was not a matter to dispute about. It is the most natural division which can be made, and will give more general satisfaction than the plan of the hon. member the Leader of the Opposition. Besides, when our representatives go to Ottawa, they will have to plead as one man, for general, and not local or sectional rights or interests.
Mr. MCLEAN said that as there is more uncultivated land in Prince and King's County, than there is in Queen's, it will be found that in the future these Counties will increase in population at a greater ratio than Queen's. He thought the resolution just and reasonable, and would support it.
Mr. SULLIVAN regarded the argument urged by the hon. member the Leader of the Opposition, such as went to show he was striving to make a point, rather than doing so. Nor did the principle of representation by population, thought admitted in the North America Act, apply as the Opposition wish it to be understood. Any one who will read that Act will find that the principle applies to Provinces, and not to electoral districts. Quebec, for instance, is divided into sixty-five electoral districts, each of which returns one member for Parliament, yet in this arrangement no respect whatever is paid to population. Nova Scotia is the same, except in the County of Halifax, which returns two members, and recently Picton. In New Brunswick the same principle applies. In Ontario the ridings now returning members existed before Confederation. It cannot be shown that the principle contended for in the amendment is in harmony with the practice in the Dominion. The Leader of the Opposition appears to ground his objection on two reasons:— 1st, That it is unfair to divide this Island into districts by Counties ; and 2nd, that the Opposition had not been consulted in the matter. He was willing to admit that this was the strongest reason of the two. But he did not consider that the Government 206 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 was bound to do so. When the members of the Comm9ons go up to Ottawa, it will not be noticed whether they represent few or many. For his part he would not consent that King's County should have less of a representation than Queen's. He knew the people would not be satisfied with less. It is all very well to speak about the attention due to population, but it should also be borne in mind that there are County rights to be considered, and these the Leader of the Opposition has entirely lost sight of. The general interests of one County are pretty much the same as those of another, all of which will require to be attended to He will support the resolution.
Mr. P. SINCLAIR said the wealth and population of Queen's County was three times that of King's. That the princple recognized in the North America Act, was representation by population, and to act upon any other principle here will be to do Queen's County an injustice.
Hon. Mr. HOWLAN said it was all very well for hon. members to boast of the wealth and extraordinary intelligence of Queen's County ; but other considerations should be taken into account also. Queen's County contained the capital of the Island. This one act drew men of means to Queen's County. Trade and shipping, with emigration, flowed to the central County first, and these facts account for the increased population of Queen's County. But the other Counties are gradually increasing in wealth and population, and at no distant day may increase in these at a greater ratio than in the now more densely populated County. Besides, in a matter of this kind, it is our duty to look to the future. Any other course will be unfair, and based upon a wrong principle. As the hon. member for St. Peter's said, it was their duty to take care that County rights were not overlooked.
G.
Mr. T. KELLY said that some hon. members attempted to make light of Summerside, but although it was a small town, it was not to be despised, as it was rapidly increasing in size, and its trade flourishing. Hon. members of the Opposition wished to make it appear that the original intention of those who inaugurated the scheme of Confederation, was to carve the Provinces into districts, so as to give each but one representative ; but this was not the case. It was not deemed necessary to form new electoral districts, for the districts existing at the time the union took place, were adopted as they were. Two much stress had been laid upon the fact that the population of Queen's County exceeds that of each of the other two Counties. To say that Queen's County is equal in wealth and intelligence to the other two Counties put together, was going too far. Was this encomium bestowed upon Queen's County because it was the seat of the famous Tenant League organization of which a certain hon. member of the Opposition was a prominent member and endorser, which trampled under foot the laws of the land, and to suppress which British troops were sent from Halifax? Was that the way in which it exhibited its intelligence ? He believed that the Tenant League did extend, at one time, to some parts of King's County, particularly the Murray Harbor district ; but it had never obtained a footing in Prince County. The representation of this Island should be adapted to the existing County divisions, instead of forming six new electoral districts, which would require to be re-arranged whenever the Island is 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 207 entitled to an additional member. The questions which will come up before the Dominion Parliament, affecting the interests of Queen's County, will, in an almost equal degree, affect the interests of each of the other two Counties. A representative from either of the Counties will be a representative of the whole Island as well. It was more convenient in every way, and adapted to the three divisions into which the country has been so long divided, to apportion the representation as proposed in the resolution submitted by the hon. Leader of the Government. He would, therefore, oppose the amendment.
Mr. LAIRD said that the Government party contended that it was more respectable to represent large districts than for each member to represent one-sixth part of the Island, as proposed in the amendment. If there was anything at all in their arguments, they should make the whole Island one electoral district, and let the whole six members run their election together. In his former remarks he said that the grand principle that underlaid the Quebec Scheme, was representation by population. If that was the grand aim of the Canadians, and yet not fully carried out in its details, why might not we begin right, at once, by dividing the Island into the required number of electoral districts ? It is unfiar that the people of Queen's County should have to bear the heaviest part of the burden of taxation, and yet be deprived of the representation to which they are entitled. They have a good reason to complain of unfair treatment, as they had to bear the largest share of the Railway burden, which was brought upon them by the representatives from the outlying Counties. They now claim their rights in the representation to the Dominion House of Commons, and are fully entitled to them. It is the land lying vacant in Prince County which the hon. member for Summerside wishes to see represented, or the industrious and intelligent people of Queen's County ? It seems to be the former ! There is no fairer method of representation than by population. He (Mr. L.) did not boast of the superior intelligence and wealth of the people of Queen's County, compared with those of the outlying Counties, but contended that man for man, they were as intelligent and as wealthy as the people of either Prince County or King's County, and, therefore, were, on that ground, entitled to representation according to their number. They had no right to disfranchise, in order to give the people of the other two Counties a greater representation than they were entitled to receive. Hon. members who represent large constituencies are generally of opinion that the smaller the constitution, the smaller the men, or in other words " the smaller the pond the smaller the frogs." But we often find the reverse to be the case. A great deal had been said about the interests of the outlying Counties, but not a word about swamping the electors of Queen's County, although it was well known that the representation of the latter was virtually swamped in that House by the representatives of the other Counties. All that he asked for Queen's County was equality, and nothing more. The views of her people were as much entitled to respect as those of the people of the other Counties, and were, therefore, entitled to equal representation. The Province of Quebec is divided into sixty- five electoral divisions, which were in existence before the union took place, and each division is entitled to return one member only to the House of Commons. Ontario did not adopt the old electoral districts, but formed new ones in order that its people might be represented according to population. 208 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 Each Country in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick returns one member, except the County containing Halifax in the former, and St. John in the latter Province, which is, in both cases, entitled to send two representatives. When two members are allotted to a single district, the system of log rolling is generally practised to a greater or less extent, to the detriment of the interests of the people. The present County divisions f this Island are merely artificial, and there is nothing to prevent the division of the country into groups of townships, each forming an electoral district. The population of the Island should, as nearly as possible, be divided into six equal parts, by means of the township boundaries, in order that each electoral district should have only one representative of its own in the House of Commons, and to carry out the grand principle of representation by population.
HON. ATTY. GENERAL said that the hon. Leader of the Opposition was correct in saying that he (Mr. B.) had told him that the last delegation had secured $88,000 in addition to the Terms brought down by the former delegation ; but he (Mr. B.) had also told that hon. member that he did not know whether the whole of that sum was direct or indirect. He was still prepared to prove that his statement was correct, and would do so, provided that hon. member would give him in return a history of the scheming of the Opposition during the absence of the delegates. The hon. member would be sorry to see ten cents granted by the Dominion Parliament to put an end to the long agitated education question, as it would deprive him of a large amount of political capital at election times. It was not the man who polled the largest number of votes that was remarkable for the greatest amount of political honesty or augacity. What was the means of giving the hon. member, himself, a seat in the House ? He printed a thousand copies of a Speech, delivered by the hon. gentleman, who was his political opponent, at an educational establishment, under the control of Roman Catholics, and placed a copy in every Protestant house in his district. Because credit was rendered where credit was due, that Speech was made use of as political capital by the hon. member. The people of Pisquid, on the other hand, were told that the same hon. gentleman, who paid so high a tribute to the Catholic Clergy, was a member of the great Presbyterian Synod !
MR. LAIRD said that what he did in Belfast, during the election campaign, he had done openly, and above board. He had contested the election fairly and openly, and, when electioneering, had frequently met the hon. Atty. General, who always did more good than harm by his statements. He had showed up the inconsistency of the hon. Col. Gray, and had acted honestly in doing so. That gentleman claimed the right to represent the Belfast district, partly on the ground that he had presided over a meeting of Protestant clergymen, held a short time before in St. Paul's school room, in this City, for the purpose of opposing grants to sectarian schools. He showed the inconsistency of the hon. gentleman who had at one time claimed to be the champion of Protestantism, and at the other expressed opinions at a certain institution, under the control of Roman Catholics, in favor of sectarian grants. There was no reason that could be adduced to show that he had no right to show up such inconsistency, as he, himself, had ever maintained one text and one principle in reference to the School Question. He had never attempted to deceive the people of this Island by giving pledges on one question, while, in the meanwhile, he worked hard in an opposite direction. The present Government had obtained place and 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 209 power by practising deception on that very question.
Hon. ATTY. GENERAL said that when the hon. Leader of the Opposition charged the Government with getting the reins of power by misrepresentation and deception, he was largely inaccurate. The hon. member talked about deception, but what was the truth? The very man who raised the Protestant howl in Belfast, went to Inkerman House, a short before, and invited the hon. Col Gray to run the Charlottetown election against himself and Mr. Pope, on the Protestant ticket. No clerical influence had ever been the means of securing his (Mr. B.) election for Charlottetown, and he had never dragged in the education question as a stalking horse upon which to ride into place and power.
Mr. L. H. DAVIES believed that every Roman Catholic who supported the hon. Atty. General at last election, did so on the understanding that the hon. member would support a grant to the Bishop's schools. It was an extremely suspicious circumstance that the hon. member could not take part in the discussion before the Com mittee, without referring to a matter that had no connexion whatever with the matter under consideration. The principle established in the Province of Quebec was not intended to extend in any way to the other Provinces, as its representation was fixed, while that of the latter was to be elastic, i. e. to increase with the population.
Hon. LEADER OF THE GOVERNMENT was sorry to see the discussion taking the turn which had been given it, by hon. members dragging in matters that had nothing to do whatever with the subject under discussion. The last resolution had been passed unanimously, and he hope the present one would be passed in the same manner, without any loss of time, and that both sides should agree upon the question, in order that they might be able to join in the Address to Her Majesty. He thought the hon. Leader of the Opposition much better qualified for acting on the stage than for taking part in the meetings of the Young Man's Christian Association. The hon. member had not lost an opportunity for several evenings, of repeating his remarks upon certain matters which were now worn out. He (Mr. Laird) had referred over and over again to the rotting hemlock timber, referred to in the correspondence between the delegates and the Finance Minister ; but the less he said about the arguments used in that correspondence the better, as he did all his power to prevent the delegates from receiving better Terms. The hon. member had sent up to Ottawa copies of his newspaper, which did not contain the facts in reference to the sending of that delegation, in order to prevent the obtaining of better Terms for his Colony. The editorial stated that he (Mr. Pope) was prepared to accept the Terms then before the country, if he could not secure better Terms ; which was not the case. Other statements were sent up to Ottawa by friends of the hon. member, to the effect that the general expectation of the people was, that better Terms could not be procured, and that they were satisfied with the Terms already offered them. Any member of that hon. House, or of the community, who made a statement in order to prevent securing better Terms from the Dominion, was no friend to the country, as he had no regard for its best interests. He wold now return to the question more immediately before the Committee. No County in any of the Provinces had been divided in the formation of their electoral districts, as had been proposed by the 210 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 hon. Leader of the Opposition in reference to this Island. Ontario, it was true, owing to its dense population, had a member allotted to each Riding, into which it was divided, but no portion of any County had been cut off and joined to another detached portion of another County. Some members of the House of Commons represent several thousands of electors, while others represent only a few hundreds, showing that although the principle of representation by population was carried out with regard to each Province, as a whole, it was not carried out with regard to the electoral districts. The hon. Leader of the Opposition had made a statement to him (Mr. Pope) to the effect that it would be better to divide the Island into electoral districts, according to the Counties, than to divide it into sections, irrespective of the Counties. But the hon. member now objected to the division by Counties, on the ground that an unpopular man might run his election with a popular man, and thus secure his return to the House of Commons. The remedy for this difficulty would be in the hands of the electors, who would have the power to return the men of their own choosing. He (Mr. P.) would like to see Queen's County with a larger representation than at present intended, but as there will be no sectional differences in our representation in the Dominion House of Commons, the six members chosen will represent the whole Island, and its interests as a whole will receive more attention than those of any particular section. Our representatives should all stand shoulder to shoulder for the general interests of the Island, and he could not, therefore, see what good would be done by carrying out the principles contained in the amendment. As we shall be entitled to an additional member whenever the population reaches the required number, a re-arrangement of the whole plan would be required if the amendment were carried out. On the other hand, if each County is made an electoral district, the additional member can be given to Queen's County, which will then receive its full share of representation. In the meantime, this County will have a representation of two members in the Senate, while each of the other Counties will have but one. As the other resolution was passed by a unanimous vote of that House, and as it was intended to appoint a Committee composed of members from both sides of the House, to prepare an Address to Her Majesty, in conformity with the British North America Act, he thought it a pity that the Opposition had brought in an amendment which they were well aware they were not able to carry, He hoped the hon. Leader of the Opposition, who moved the amendment, would withdraw it, and that every hon. member of the Opposition would give the original resolution his support, in order that there might be a unanimous vote on the Address.
Hon. Mr. HOWLAN said that the Province of Quebec was divided into sixty-five electoral districts, composed of its former electoral divisions, which were left as they were. He concluded that the representation of that Province would not be increased with the increase of population, as in the Maritime Provinces. Each County in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick was constituted an electoral district, irrespective of population, with the exception of Halifax County in Nova Scotia, and the County of St. John in New Brunswick, which on account of containing the cities of Halifax and St. John, were entitled to return two members each. The only exception to the rule of making each County an electoral district, was Ontario, which was divided into Counties, Ridings of Counties, cities and parts of cities and towns. As the neighbouring Provinces 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 211 had constituted each County an electora1 district, we would only be following their example in doing the same with regard to this Island. Queen's County had always received the lion's share of the public money. The old argument that the people of that County pay more towards the construction and maintenance of the Railway than those of the other Counties, would not do in the face of the fact that they had always received more than their share of the public money. The people of St. Peters, Souris, &c., paid pro rata, for the construction of all the macadamized road in Qeeen's County ; but what amount of benefit did they rcceive from it ? What advantage did remote parts of the country receive from the large amount of money expended to maintain steam communication, for many years past, between Charlottetown and the neighboring Provinces ? Prince County paid its share of the cost of steam communication for many years before it received the benefits of it. Whose money was contributed to pay for the erection of those expensive public buildings in Charlottetown ? Why should not the people in distant parts of the country have macadamized roads as well as Charlottetown and adjacent districts ? Those who advocated the construction of a Railway were acting for the best interests of the people of the whole Island, when they did so, by making provision for districts, as well as more highly favored parts. Why should one hundred acres of land, situated at West River, be more valuable than an equal area in the western part of Prince County, where the soil is equally as good ? The farmers near Charlottetotvn have hitherto had a grand monopoly of our market, and it is now high time that those of more distant parts should share in the benefits of a ready market for their produce. A good deal has been said about the correspondence between the last delegation and the Finance Minister of the Dominion. The former delegation were so wise in their own eyes, that they thought the people of this Island did not want to see their correspondence, and the consequence is that there is not a line of it before the House. The last delegates placed their correspondence upon the table of the House, and were not ashamed of it, in any respect. What the School Question had to do with the matter now before the Committee, be was at a loss to understand. When the hon. junior member for Belfast stated that he had no denominational influence at his back to carry his election, he stated what every gentleman within the sound of his voice knew to be false, and what he himself knew to be untrue. That hon. member, during his canvass, declared that the hon. Col. Gray was not to be trusted on the School Question, because he had stated at a public examination at St. Dunstan's College, that if he had a son, he would entrust that institution with his education. For that reason alone, twelve hundred Protestants were besought to keep that hon. gentleman out of Parliament. He (Mr. H.) believed that the public mind was diseased on that unfortunate School Question. When in Ottawa, he heard the hon. Hilliard Cameron, Grand Master of the Orange Lodges in the Dominion, speak in the House of Commons in favor of denominational schools, now established in Ontario, and receiving State aid. When a division took place in the House of Commons, in reference to the education question, almost the whole Protestant majority voted in favor of denominational education. It is a most extraordinary fact that the Protestantism of the Upper Provinces differs from the Protestantism of this Island in reference to this great question of education. The hon. Mr. Cameron said that there was not a single Protestant in Ontario, who 212 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 would seek to Fon the Catholics of denominational schools. Although the Catholics of Ontario had enjoyed their separate school system for fifteen years, not a Protestant in the Province sought to deprive them of it. The only conclusion he could arrive at, was that the public mind in this country was diseased upon the School Question, at the present time. Because Mr. Hensley's Government in 1869 extended the rites of hospitality to two Canadian statesmen who visited this Island, they were denounced by the editor of the Patriot as Confederates ; and the ministers of the Dominion Government were abused and declared to be " swells and pedlars." Four years have passed away, and every hon. member in the House is now in favor of Confederation ! He (Mr. H.) had no doubt but that the public mind would undergo a similar change in reference to the School Question, within the new few years. The time, he believed, was not far distant, when that question would not be used as a shuttlecock by politicians, and when justice would be done the Catholic minority of this Island. He had been denounced throughout the length and breadth of the country, because he had, while a member of the old Liberal Government, asked that His Lordship Bishop McIntyre, be granted a proportionate share of the public school funds, according to the number of children taught in his schools. If he had then committed a sin, he was still a sinner in every respect, in reference to that matter. He hoped and believed the day would soon arrive when Col. Gray would not be afraid to enter a Catholic school, and express himself frankly in reference to its management and the good it was doing among the youths of this Colony. If he (Mr. H.) went into the new Methodist School, and pronounced his opinion upon the work it was performing, would that make him a Methodist ? By no means. Yet that was all that Col. Gray did with reference to St. Dunstan's College ; he did not express an opinion in favor of Roman Catholicism. He (Mr. H.) could not understand why hon. members of that House could not speak about farming, fishing, and the arts and sciences, without flying off at a tangent and getting alarmed on the School Question. Such conduct could only be compared to that of the turkey cock, when he sees red flannel –he makes off at full speed. It must be a source of pleasure to the hon. Col. Gray, when he reflects on the fact that he lost his election through fear lessly expressing his honest convictions in reference to the denominational school system.
Hon. Mr. SULLIVAN said that the hon. junior member for Murray Harbor had misrepresented his remarks altogether. What he (Mr. S.) endeavored to show, was that the principle of representation by population was not carried out in its details, in the Province of Quebec. As each of the old electoral districts was constituted an electoral district under the Dominion, and as those districts under the immensely in population. He believed it was the hon. Leader of the Opposition who commenced the digression in the debate. The hon. Atty. General's remarks were called for by the impertinent language of the hon. Leader of the Opposition. The matter dragged in by the latter had nothing whatever to do with the question before the Committee, but the hon. member frequently indulged himself in snob digressions, when he found some persons ready to tramp their feet and make some noise. He (Mr. S.) hoped and trusted that as we were about entering 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 213 the Dominion, all the old petty squables would be some, never to rise again ; and that the hon. member, when contesting the election for the Canadian House of Commons, with no find it necessary to drag the speech, made by hon. Col. Gray, at St. Dunstan's College, into the political arena. The hon. member had sounded the pocain among the hon. members of the Opposition, but he (Mr. S.) would advise him to take the advice tendered him by the Leader of the Government to let the resolution pass without further opposition.
MR. LAIRD said that the hon. member for St. Pet's [Mr. Sullivan] had endeavored to show that the Opposition should not express their opinions in reference to the important matter before the Committee, because they were in a minority ; and had even went so far as to pronounce his [Mr. L's] remarks impertinent ! The hon. member's remarks were impertinent in the highest degrees but he [Mr. L.] dared him to prove that his language had been impertinent in the slightest degree. The first hon. member who had, that evening, referred to the School Question, was the hon, Atty, General, who declared he would tell him [Mr. L] a little about his canvas in the Belfast district. In attempting to do this, the hon. member had brought up the School Question. He [Mr. L.] had never questioned the right of the hon. Col. Gray to visit St. Dunstan's College, and express his opinions on the instruction imparted there. What he [Mr. L.] did state, was, that if he found that gentleman's conduct at variance with his professions, he had a right to show it up before the public man. He believed that he had gained his election independent of that matter. The other candidate for the Belfast district —Mr. Smith, was an Orangeman and an anti-grant man, and yet he had been defeated as well as Col Gray. When the latter visited St Dunstan's College, he not only complimented the scholars of that institution, but expressed the hope that before long it would receive both the private and public support of the community. When he heard that hon. gentleman declare that he had ever been ready to defend Protestant interests, and that his forefathers had shed their blood in the defence of Protestantism, he [Mr. L.] merely asked the people to judge but when his present profession and past action, and whether or not it was likely he would, while in the political field, express his read sentiments. He did not know that the members of the minority were very unpopular in the country. He believed that the Government would find that the principles for which the Oppositon were contending, were most in favor with the people generally. The members of the Opposition had merely asked that the Island be divided into six districts, according to population, and in doing so, had shown no impertinence whatever, notwithstanding the assertion of the hon. Solicitor General. They were merely contending for what they believed to be the true principle, viz., representation by population, and had a perfect and unquestionable right to move the amendment now before the Committee, and to defend it also.
Hon. ATTY. GENERAD said that the hon. Leader of the Opposition was the first who had broached the School Question. That matter should have been kept out of the present debate altogether, as the subject under consideration demanded the fullest attention of both sides of the House. If this hon. m,ember or his friends wanted a full explanation of his conduct dur ing the canvass, or at any other time, he was prepared to give it on the floor of that House, as he was satisfied that it would beat the strictest investigation.
214 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873
Hon. Mr. McEACHEN said that the hon. junior member for Murray Harbor was very sensitive on the score of taunts in reference to the political canvass, although he himself was among the first to taunt others in refbrenee to their political platform. Although Catholics were silent in reference to the School Question, they were, by no means, satisfied with the present state of our educational matters. They were in a minority, and, therefore had to submit to the course maintained by the majority, but they looked forward to the time when they expected to see the School Question settled satisfactorily and amicably.
Hon. COL. SECRETARY said that had it not been for the closing remarks of the hon. Leader of the Opposition, he would not have spoken. He had hoped that all side issues would have been kept out ofthe debate, and that hon members on both sides of the House would have confined themselves to the important question before them, but it appeared that to the very last moment of the existence of our separate Legislature, hon. members were determined to drag into their debates questions that had nothing whatever to do with the sutbject before them. Anti-Confederation and Escheat had gone to the tomb of all the capulets, but the School Question had taken their place. He had heard an hon. member state, a few days since, that our Legislature had now been in existence a century, and that when he reflected on the change that was about to take place, he did not know whether to weep over the past or to laugh for joy at the grand prospects of the future of our little Colony. A great deal had been said about the iron rod, but he thought that the greatest iron rod ever held over hon. members of that House, was the iron rod of the Opposition ! What did the hon. Leader of the Opposition mean by stating that if the House of As sembly did not give the Opposition their rights, another House would do so? He (Mr. H.) never would consent that the Legislative Council should dictate to the people how they shall be representedd in the Dominion House of Commons. It seemed as if there had been a grand caucus of the Opposition, at which it had been decided that if their amendment could not be carried in the House of Assembly, they would bring the question to a final issue in the Upper Branch, and throw out the Address to Her Majesty, altogether, unless the electoral districts are constituted according to the views of the minority ! But the threat would fall harmless. Let their Lordships—the Conscript Fathers as they are styled—imperil the Colony when she is on the verge of bankruptcy, and they will have to bear the responsibility of their political act. Matters had surely come too pretty pass in this Colony, when the minority in the House of Assembly threatened the majority that if they did not accede to their wishes, the Upper Branch of the Legislature would do so. They wanted an irresponsible body of Councillors to dictate to the people's Branch of the Legislature, but such threats fell harmlessly upon the majority of the House of Assembly, which had the right to say how this Island should be divided into electoral districts for representation in the Dominion House of Commons.
MR. LAIRD had held no threats over the majority of the House of Assembly, but he had stated that although for the time being the Liberal Party were in a minority in the House of Assembly, they were not in a minority everywhere in the Legislature, and that the principles held by the Opposition were not those of a minority in the other end of the building. Itwas not long since the hon. Col. Secretary was glad to have himself wrapped in " swaddling clothes," as he delights to 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 215 style matters in the Upper end. It was not in the power of the Goverment to force this measure through the Legislature, and to make it the law of the land, contrary to the wishes of the people, as they did the Railway Bill. The Opposition were not disposed to be so obedient as to be frightened by the iron rod of the Government into allowing the measure brought down by the latter to pass without a protest. He believed that if the present Government were to appeal to the country at that moment, they would not be able to bring back a majority to that House. It was in vain for the hon. Col. Secretary to say he would put the Upper Branch at defiance, as he could not carry the measure, now before the Committee, into effect, without its assistance. The hon. member had, at last, confessed that the country was on the verge of bankruptcy. What an argument to employ for the purpose of forcing the Opposition to vote for the measure before the Committee ! The Government had, at last, to confess that they had brought the country to the verge of bankruptcy by their Railway policy!
Mr. L. H. DAVIES did not wonder that the hon.Leader of the Opposition could not sit silent after the impertinent remarks of certain gentleman on the other side of the House. He could understand the remarks of his honor the Leader of the Government, when he expressed the hope that the measure would be passed unanimously, but he, was surprised at the hon. member for St. Peters accusing the Oppo sition of impertinence. It was very easy for his honor the Col. Secretary to tell the Opposition that he would carry the resolution in spite of them, but it would have looked more manly if he had spoken to the question, as one of a number, instead of acting in such a dictatorial manner. The hon. members of the Opposition felt taht they were right in pursuing the course they had taken. As the delegation appointed by the late Government, had, in their negociations with the Government of the Dominion, obtained Terms which the Opposition were elected to support, the latter would have been false to their principles, if they had swallowed them and voted blindly for a resolution appoiting another delegation, and promising to ratify whatever Terms the latter might bring down from Ottawa. He was sorry that insults had also been offered to the Upper Branch of the Legislature, during the debate. It was not, to say the least, good policy, to tell the Legislative Council that the House of Assembly could pass the measure and cause it to become the law of the land, in spite of them.
Mr. MCNEILL said that if each County were constituted an electoral district, Queen's County would not receive a fair representation in the Dominion House of Commons,although her people would compare favorably in numbers and intelligence, with those of the other two Counties united. The Island should be divided in such a manner as to give representation according to the population, to each district, and the very best men should be chosen to represent our people in the Dominion Parliament. A hard battle had been fought in Canada for the principle of representation by population, although it had not been carried out there in its details, as it should have been. The country should be divided into six districts, in order that each might be represented by one member only. This question should not be made a party measure, but should be discussed on its merits. Queen's County had never had her fair proportion of representation in that House, but a good opportunity now offered to give her a due share of representation in the House of Com mons of the Dominion.
Hon. COL. SECRETARY said that the 216 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 hon. member for Rustice had been a representative of Queen's County for several years, and yet had never been a supporter of a Government in favor of bringing down a measure to have the country represented according to population. The hon. member for New London had been a Leader of a Government before now, but he [Mr. H.] never was aware, till the present time, that he was in favor of representation by population. He had never heard the party to which those hon. members belonged, agitate for this princple till to-day.
Mr. SINCLAIR said that if argument proved anything at all, the Opposition had so far had the best of it; and he believed the people, generally, would approve the amendment before the Committee. The question of representation had never before been before the House since he had a seat in it. He had often thought that Queen's County had not had her fair share of representation in that House, but had never been so thoroughly convinced of the fact till now. If ever the iron rod had been threatened, it was on that evening by the hon. Colonial Secretary, who declared that whether the Opposition wished the Island to be divided according to Counties or not, the measure submitted by the hon. Leader of the Government would become the law of the land. To put off Queen's County with only two representatives, while she has double the population and wealth of each of the other Counties, is unjust, unreasonable, and countrary to the spirit of the British North America Act. Throughout the whole of the Dominion, the principle of having only one representative for each district, was carried out so fully, that there is not a single electoral district in the whole country that has two representatives in the House of Commons. The Opposition had advanced the clearest proofs and arguments to show the correctness of the principle they had laid down, but the question might just as well be decided at once, as the Government seemed determined to carry their resolution.
MR. CALLBECK had failed to perceive any argument from the Government side of the House to prove the principle they had laid down to be a sound one. Some hon. members of the Government, had, as members of our Banking Institutions, advocated strongly against the very princple for which they were now contending. As Queen's County represented double the wealth and population of each of the other Counties, it was very unjust that she should be deprived of a proportional share of representation in the Dominion House of Commons. Never had so good an opportunity been offered to secure justice to Queen's County, as the present one. Representation by population was the only just and equitable mode of settling the question. If a large vote was all that was wanted by the Government, they could easily secure it by constituting the whole Island one district, and letting the six members run for it. When two representatives were allotted each district, the interests of the minority were sunk altogether. The principle of allotting one member to each electoral district, was undoubtedly the correct one, and should be adopted in the present case. The plan proposed by the hon. Leader of the Government was unfair and unreasonable, and would deprive the people of Queen's County of their just share of representation. The general rule observed throughout the Dominion was to allow one member for each district, and there was no reason why it should not be carried out on this Island. Neither precedent nor justice would bear out the Government in their present course. Some regard should be had for the wishes of the majority, as it was not a party ques 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 217 tion, unless the Government made it one.
The question was then put on the amendment and lost on a division of Yeas 10; Nays 18.
The main resolution was then put and carried.
On motion, the Speaker took the chair, and the Chairman reported three resolutions agreed to.
Said resolutions were again read at the Clerk's table. On motion of hon. J. C. Pope, seconded by Mr. D. Laird, that the first and second resolutions be agreed to. The question was put and the House divided as follows:-
Yeas- Hons. Pope, Howlan, McEachen, F. Kelly, Lefurgy, Haviland, Brecken, Sullivan, Davies; Messrs, Owen, T. Kelly, Arsenault, John Yeo, James Yeo, A. C. McDonald, A. J. McDonald, J. A. McDonald, McLean, McIsaac, Laird, Callbeck, McNeill, Rowe, Beer, Sinclair, Stewart, L. H. Davies - 27.
Nays- Messrs, Howatt and Holland.
So it was passed in the affirmative.
The third resolution was then again read and the question having been put the House divided as follows:-
Yeas- Hons. Pope, Howlan, McEachen, F. Kelly, Lefurgy, Haviland, Brecken, Sullivan, Davies; Messrs. Owen, T. Kelly, Arsenault, John Yeo, James Yeo, A. C. McDonald, A. J. McDonald, J. A. McDonald, McLean, McIsaac, Laird, Callbeck, McNeill, Rowe, Beer, Sinclair, Stewart, L. H. Davies, Holland, - 28.
Nays- Mr. Howatt, - 1
So it was carried in the affirmative.
I. O.
MR. LAIRD's amendment was then put and lost, when, before the resolution was put, Mr. Laird moved the following amendment:-
Resolved, That the districts for the representation of this Island in the House of Commons of the Dominion, be the same as the districts for the election of members to the Legislative Council, excepting the City of Charlottetown, which shall, for the present, be united with the First Legislative Council district of Queen's County.
Which was seconded by Mr. Sinclair, and being put was lost on the following division.
Yeas- Mr. Laird, hon. B. Davies Mr. Callbeck, McNeil, Rowe, Beer, Sinclair, Stewart, E. H. Davies, James Yeo,- 10
Nays- Hons. Mr. Pope, Howlan, McEachen, Kelly, Lefurgy, Haviland, Brecken, Sullivan; Mr. T. Kelly, Arsenault, John Yeo, A. C. McDonald, A. J. McDonald, McLean, McIsaac, Howatt, Holland, J. A. McDonald, - 19.
On the motion of hon. Mr. Pope, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, when the resolutions were reported agreed to.
MR. HOWATT said in going into the Dominion it is for all time to come. It is making a bargain which cannot be broken. Every power vested in the dominion Parliament can be exercised over us. They have the power now to make a re-adjustment of the debt of the other colonies, and it will have power also to levy a portion of this upon us. Our credit will be lost, and our position reduced to something like that of the Magdalen Islands. He would prefer remaining out in the cold, and thought it would be more patriotic to manage the affairs of our own little Island ourselves. The time will come when we will regret the position we are in, and the step now taken.
The resolutions agreed to in Committee, were then severally read by the Clerk, and are as follows:-
1st. Resolved, That by a Report, dated 21st May, instant, from the hons. 218 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1878 Messrs. Pope Haviland and Howlan, delegates appointed by His Honor the Lieutenant Governor of this Island, in accordance with an Address from this House, to negotiate for terms and conditions of Union with the Dominion of Canada, together with other papers. upon the same subject, laid before this House by Messag from His Honor the Lieutenant Governor, of the 22nd day of May, instant, this House learns that the said delegates have agreed with the Government of the Dominion of Canada, that this Island shall enter into Union with the said Dominion of Canada, upon the terms and conditions following:
1. That Canada shall be liable for the debts and liabilities of Prince Edward 'Island at the time of the Union.
2. That, in consideration of the large expenditure authorized by the Parliament of Canada for the construction of Railways and Canals, and in view of the possibility of a re-adjustment of the financial arrangements between Canada and the several Provinces now embraced in the Dominion, as well as the isolated and exceptional condition of Prince Edward Island, that Colony shall, on entering the union, be en— titled to incur a debt equal to fifty dollars per head of its population. as shown by the Census Returns of 1871, that is to say: Four millions seven hundred and one thousand and fifty dollars ($4,701,050.)
3. That Prince Edward Island, not having incurred debts equal to the sum mentioned in the next preceding resolution, shall be entitled to receive by half-yearly payments, in advance, from the General Government, interest at the rate of fiver per cent per annum on the difference, from time to time, between the actual amount of its indebtedness and the amount of indebtedness authorized as aforesaid, vix:- Four millions seven hundred and one thousand and fifty dollars. ($4,701,050.)
4. That Prince Edward Island shall be liable to Canada for the amount, if any, by which its public debt and liabilities at the date of the union may exceed For millions seven hundred and one thousand and fifty dollars, ($4,701,050), and shall be chargeable with interest at the rate of five per cent per annum on such excess.
5. That, as the Government of Prince Edward Island holds no lands from the Crown, and consequently enjoys no revenue from that source for 'the construction and maintenance of local works, the Dominion Government shall pay by half-yearly instalments, in advance, to the Government of Prince Edward Island, Forty-five thousand dollars ($45,000) per-anunm, less interest at five per cent, per annum, upon any sum not exceeding Eight hundred thousand dollars, (800,000), which the Dominion Government may advance to the Prince Edward Island Government, for the purchase of lands now held by large proprietors.
6. That, in consideration of the transfer to the Parliament of Canada of the powers of taxation, the following sums shall be paid yearly by Canada to Prince Edward Island for the support of its Government and Legislature—that is to say, Thirty thousand dollars ($30,000), and an annual grant equal to eighty cents per head of its population, as shown by the Census Returns of 1871, viz., 94,021, both by half-yearly payments in advance ; such grant of eighty cents per head to be augmented in proportion to the increase of population of the Island, as may be shewn by each subsequent decennial Census, until the population amounts to Four Hundred Thousand, at which rate such a grant shall there after remain, it being understood that the next census shall be taken in the year 1881.
7. That the Dominion Government shall assume and defray all the charges {or the following services, viz:-
1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 219
A. The Salary of the Lieutenant Governor.
B. The Salaries of the Judges of the Superior Court, and of the District or County Courts, when established.
C. The charges in respect to the Department of Customs.
D. The Postal Department.
E. The Protection of the Fisheries.
F. The Provision for the Militia.
G. The Lighthouses, Ship wrecked crews, Quarantine and Marine Hospitals.
H. The Geological Survey.
I. The Penitentiary.
J. Efficient Steam Service for the conveyance of Mails and Passengers, to be established and maintained between the Island and the Main Land of the Dominion, winter and summer, thus placing the Island in continuous communication with the Intercolonial Railway, and the Railway system of the Dominion.
K. The maintenance of Telegraphic Communication between the Island and the Main Land of the Dominion, and such other chargers as may be incident to and connected with the services, which, by the " British North America Act, 1867," appertain to the general government, and as are or may be allowed to the other Provinces.
8. That the Railways under contract in course of construction for the Government of the Island, shall be the property of Canada.
9. That the new building, in which are held the Law Courts, Registry Office, &c., shall be transferred to Canada, on the payment of Sixty-nine thousand dollars, ($69,000). The purchase to include the land on which the building stands, and a suitable space of ground in addition, for yard room, &c.
10. That the Steam Dredge Boat in course of construction shall be taken by the Dominion at a cost not exceeding Twenty-two thousand dollars, ($22,000).
11. That the Steam Ferry Boat, owned by the Government of the Island, and used as such, shall remain the property of the Island.
12. That the population of Prince Edward Island having been increased by fifteen thousand or upwards since the year 1861, the Island shall be represented in the House of Commons of Canada, by six members. The representation to be re-adjusted from time to time, under the provisions of the " British North America Act, 1867."
13. That the constitution of the Executive Authority and of the Legislature of Prince Edward Island, shall, subject to the provisions of the " British North America Act, 1867," continue as at the time of the Union, until altered under the authority of the said Act. And the House of Assembly of Prince Edward Island, existing at the date of the union, shall, unless sooner dissolved, continue for the period for which it was elected.
14. That the Provisions in the " British North America Act, 1867 " shall, except those parts there of which are in terms made, or by reasonable intendment may be held to be specially applicable to, and, only to effect one, and not the whole of the Provinces now composing the Dominion, and except so far as the same may be varied by these resolutions, be applicable to Prince Edward Island, in the same way and to the same extent as they apply to the other Provinces of the Dominion, and as if the Colony of Prince Edward Island had been one of the Provinces originally united by the said Act.
220 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873
15. That the Union shall take place on such day as Her Majesty may direct by Order in Council, or Addresses to that effect, from the Houses of the Parliament of Canada, and of the Legislature of the Colony of Prince Edward Island, under the one hundred and forty-sixth section of the "British North America Act, 1867," and that the Electoral Districts for which, the time within which, and the laws and provisions under which the first election of members to serve in the House of Commons of Canada, for such Electoral Districts shall be held, shall be such as the said Houses of the Legislature of the said Colony of Prince Edward Island may specify in their said Addresses.
2nd. Resolved, That this House concurs in the above terms of Union ; and that an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that she will be graciously pleased, by and with the advice of Her Most Honorable Privy Council, under the 146th clause of the " British North America Act, 1867," to unite Prince Edward Island with the Dominion of Canada on the terms and conditions set forth.
MR. LAIRD said, Mr. Speaker, in moving the amendments which have been lost in Committee, I did so because I thought such division of the Island into electoral divisions for representation in the Dominion, was due to Queen's County, and did so from a deep sense of what I considered to be my duty, and not for the sake of opposition or appearance. But as the main resolutions have been reported agreed to, I shall now, for the same reason, press the same ammendments upon the attention of this honorable House. I refrain from doing so because, since we are about agreeing to accept of Confederation, it is very desirable we should vote unanimously on the resolutions. I hope, therefore, that the hon. members for Bedeque will reconsider the matter. I can assure you, Sir, I ask them in all sincerity to do so. Confederation has become a necessity ; of this the hon. members trust themselves feel satisfied, therefore, it is the more desirable that the representatives of the people should all as one man record their vote for the resolutions.
MR. HOWARD.—Sir, the hon. member gives good advice, but I would like him to put in practice what he professes. His present advice does not agree with many others which he has given, nor am I prepared to say that the one which he has given is good. I opposed a union with the Dominion of Canada from the first ; and firmly believe we are taking a step which will injure our fair little Island. Indeed, I am surprised that the hon. member should undertake to advise me as to the course I should pursue, or how I should vote. I am responsible to the men who sent me here, and if I wanted advice, they, and not the hon. member, are the men I would go to for it.
MR. HOLLAND.—It was not my intention to address you Sir, at this advanced hour of the night, but as the hon. member, the Leader of the Opposition, has thought proper to make special reference to my hon. colleague and myself, I feel that it is my duty to do so. I assume the hon. members imagine that as I voted for sending the late delegates to Ottawa, I should now support the present resolution. But when I voted on that occasion I had to choose between two evils ; and the result has proved the wisdom of the vote I then gave. I had reason to believe that the delegates would obtain better Terms for this Island than the former had arranged, and their success shows that this House did right when it decided to send them up. It shows also that so far, in obtaining Terms, nothing has been lost by delay, and that if we were to delay the matter a 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 221 few years longer, we would be gainers by so doing. The hon. member, Mr. Laird, wishes my hon. colleague and myself to fall in line, and act, as he seems to imagine, a consistent part. But, Sir, if there is an hon. member in this House who has been really inconsistent as a public man, that member is himself. Before, therefore, he undertakes to instruct others about consistency, he should first put in practice what he preaches. He should recollect that the many advices of a quite contrary nature, which he has so often given, renders his present advice of little value, and entitled to scarcely any respect. Indeed, I would feel myself humiliated were I to follow the hon. member as my political leader, or recognize him as my adviser. He ought to remember that he told the people, at one time, that Confederation would cause each family to be taxed to the tune of £40 a year. Now the hon. member has seen fit to change his tune, and thinks others should vaccilate also. I ran my election on the anti-Confederate ticket, the people have not relieved me from that pledge, and I can assure the hon. member I am not going to violate any promise I made to my constituents.
The hon. Mr. Pope moved, seconded by Mr. Laird, that the first and second of the said resolutions be agreed to.
The third resolution was then again read, and is as follows :—
3rd. Resolved, That the Electoral Districts for which the first election of members to serve in the House of Commons of the Dominion of Canada, shall be as follow :—
That Prince County shall constitute one District, and return two members.
That Queen's County shall constitute one District, and return two members.
That King's County shall constitute one District, and return two members.
That the first election for members to serve in the House of Commons in Canada, shall take place within three Calendar months after this Island shall be admitted into and become part of the Dominion of Canada.
And the question being put on the said resolution, the House divided, and the names being called for, they were taken down as follows :—
Yeas—Hons. Mr. Pope, Howlan, McEachen, Kelly, Lefurgy, Haviland, Brecken, Sullivan, Davies ; Messrs. Owen, T. Kelly, Arsenault, John Yeo, James Yeo, A. C. McDonald, A. J. McDonald, J. A. McDonald, McLean, McIsaac, Laird, Callbeck, McNeill, Rowe, Beer, Sinclair, Steward, L. H. Davies, Holland,—28.
Nays—Mr. Howatt,—1.
Hon. Mr. POPE begged leave to move the following :—
Resolved, That a Committee of seven members be appointed to prepare an Address to Her Majesty the Queen, praying that Her Majesty will be graciously pleased to give effect to the resolutions of the House on the subject of a Union of Prince Edward Island with the Dominion of Canada, agreed to in a Committee of the whole House this day.
Which was seconded by Mr. Laird.
Ordered, That the hon. Mr. Pope, Mr. Laird, the hon. Mr. Haviland, Mr. Sinclair, hon. Mr. Howlan, Mr. L. H. Davies, and the hon. Mr. Brecken, do compose the said Committee.
The hon. Mr. Pope, from the last preceding Committee appointed, presented to the House the Draft of an Address, as prepared by the Committee, which is as follows :—
222 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873
To the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty :
MOST GRACIOUS SOVEREIGN,—
We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the House of Assembly of Prince Edward Island, in Parliament assembled, humbly approach your Majesty, and pray that your Majesty will be graciously pleased, by and with the advice of your Majesty's most Honorable Privy Council, under the provisions of the 146th section of "The British North America Act, 1867," to admit Prince Edward Island into the Union or Dominion of Canada, on the terms and conditions expressed in certain resolutions recently passed by Houses of the Parliament of Canada, and also by the Houses of the Legislature of Prince Edward Island, which said resolutions are as follow :—
1. That Canada shall be liable for the debts and liabilities of Prince Edward Island at the time of the Union.
2. That, in consideration of the large expenditure authorized by the Parliament of Canada for the construction of Railways and Canals, and in view of the possibility of a re-adjustment of the financial arrangements between Canada and the several Provinces now embraced in the Dominion, as well as the isolated and exceptional condition of Prince Edward Island, that Colony shall, on entering the Union, be entitled to incur a debt equal to fifty dollars per head of its population, as shown by the Census Returns of 1871, that is to say : Four millions seven hundred and one thousand and fifty dollars ($4,701,050.)
3: That Prince Edward Island, not having incurred debts equal to the sum mentioned in the next preceding resolution, shall be entitled to receive by half-yearly payments, in advance, from the General Government, interest at the rate of five per cent per annum on the difference, from time to time, be tween the actual amount of its indebtedness and the amount of indebtedness authorized as aforesaid, viz :—Four millions seven hundred and one thousand and fifty dollars. ($4,701,050.)
4. That Prince Edward Island shall be liable to Canada for the amount, if any, by which its public debt and liabilities at the date of the Union may exceed Four millions seven hundred and one thousand and fifty dollars, ($4,701,050), and shall be chargeable with interest at the rate of five per cent per annum on such excess.
5. That, as the Government of Prince Edward Island holds no lands from the Crown, and consequently enjoys no revenue from that source for the construction and maintenance of local works, the Dominion Government shall pay by half-yearly instalments, in advance, to the Government of Prince Edward Island, Forty-five thousand dollars ($45,000) per annum, less interest at five per cent, per annum, upon any sum not exceeding Eight hundred thousand dollars, ($800,000), which the Dominion Government may advance to the Prince Edward Island Government, for the purchase of lands now held by large proprietors.
6. That, in consideration of the transfer to the Parliament of Canada of the powers of taxation, the following sums shall be paid yearly by Canada to Prince Edward Island for the support of its Government and Legislature—that is to say, Thirty thousand dollars ($30,000), and an annual giant equal to eighty cents per head of its population, as shown by the Census Returns of 1871, viz., 94,021, both by half-yearly payments in advance ; such grant of eighty cents per head to be augmented in proportion to the increase of population of the Island, as may be shewn by each subsequent decennial Census, until the population amounts to Four Hundred Thousand, at which rate such a grant shall there 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 223 after remain, it being understood that the next census shall be taken in the year 1881.
7. That the Dominion Government shall assume and defray all the charges for the following services, viz :—
A. The salary of the Lieutenant Governor.
B. The Salaries of the Judges of the Superior Court, and of the District or County Courts, when established.
C. The charges in respect to the Department of Customs.
D. The Postal Department.
E. The Protection of the Fisheries.
F. The Provision for the Militia.
G. The Lighthouses, Ship wrecked crews, Quarantine and Marine Hospitals.
H. The Geological Survey.
I. The Penitentiary.
J. Efficient Steam Service for the conveyance of Mails and Passengers, to be established and maintained between the Island and the Main Land of the Dominion, winter and summer, thus placing the Island in continuous communication with the Intercolonial Railway, and the Railway system of the Dominion.
K. The maintenance of Telegraphic Communication between the Island and the Main Land of the Dominion, and such other chagers as may be incident to and connected with the services, which, by the " British North America Act, 1867," appertain to the general government, and as are or may be allowed to the other Provinces.
8. That the Railways under contract in course of construction for the Government of the Island, shall be the property of Canada.
9. That the new building, in which are held the Law Courts, Registry Office, &c., shall be transferred to Canad, on the payment of Sixty-nine thousand dollars, ($69,000). The purchase to include the land on which the building stands, and a suitable space of ground in addition for yard room, &c.
10. That the Steam Dredge Boat in course of construction shall be taken by the Dominion at a cost not exceeding Twenty-two thousand dollars, ($22,000).
11. That the Steam Ferry Boat, owned by the Government of the Island, and used as such, shall remain the property of the Island.
12. That the population of Prince Edward Island having been increased by fifteen thousand or upwards since the year 1861, the Island shall be represented in the House of Commons of Canada, by six members. The representation to be re-adjusted from time to time, under the provisions of the "British North America Act, 1867."
13. That the constitution of the Executive Authority and of the Legislature of Prince Edward Island, shall, subject to the provisions of the " British North America Act, 1867," continue as at the time of the Union, until altered under the authority of the said Act. And the House of Assembly of Prince Edward Island, existing at the date of the Union, shall, unless sooner dissolved, continue for the period for which it was elected.
14. That the Provisions in the " British North America Act, 1867 " shall, except those parts thereof which are in terms made, or by reasonable intendment may be held to be specially applicable to, and only to effect one, and not the whole of the Provinces now composing the Dominion, and except so far as the same may be varied by these resolutions, be applicable to Prince Edward Island, in the same 224 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 way and to the same extent as they apply to the other Provinces of the Dominion, and as if the Colony of Prince Edward Island had been one of the Provinces originally united by the said Act.
15. That the Union shall take place on such day as Her Majesty may direct by Order in Council, or Addresses to that effect, from the Houses of the Parliament of Canada, and of the Legislature of the Colony of Prince Edward Island, under the one hundred and forty-sixth section of the "British North America Act, 1867," and that the Electoral Districts for which, the time within which, and the laws and provisions under which the first election of members to serve in the House of Commons of Canada, for such Electoral Districts shall be held, shall be such as the said Houses of the Legislature of the said Colony of Prince Edward Island may specify in their said Addresses.
And we further humbly pray that all laws which, at the date of the Order in Council by which the said Island of Prince Edward shall be admitted into the Dominion of Canada, relating to the qualification of any person to be elected to sit or vote as a member of the House of Assembly of the said Island, and relating to the qualifications or disqualifications of voters, and to the oaths to be taken by voters, and to Returning Officers and Poll Clerks, and their powers and duties, and relating to Polling Divisions within the said Island, and relating to the proceedings at Elections, and to the period during which such Elections may be continued, and relating to the trial of controverted Elections, and the proceedings incident thereto, and relating to the vacating of seats of members, and to the execution of New Writs in case of any seat being vacated otherwise than by a dissolution, and to all other matters connected with or incidental to elections of members to serve in the House of Assembly of the said Island, shall apply to elections of members to serve in the House of Commons, for the Electoral Districts, situate in the said Island of Prince Edward Island.
Hon. Mr. POPE, said, Mr. Speaker, I rise to move that the Address be agreed to. In doing so, I will embrace the opportunity to say, that for several years I have been of the opinion that our interests would be greatly promoted by a Union with the Dominion of Canada. Nor can I now but feel, that a high honor has been conferred upon me, in being the agent, as it were, through whom, with my associates, the measure is to be completed, while the Leader of the Opposition was the mover in the question that is now before us. While saying this, it is due to my hon. friend, the hon. member for Georgetown (Mr. Haviland) to say that in this matter he has been the most consistent. At first I was not satisfied with the Quebec Terms. But when I found that the Dominion Government was prepared to deal fairly with us, I became a Confederate in principle at once ; but never felt disposed to urge the quesiton upon the country, believing as I did, that if the measure should, at any time, be carried against the will of the people, it would be an unfortunate day for this Colony. No valid reason has  been shown by my old colleague, the senior member for Bedeque, why he and his colleague should continue to oppose the measure. Bedeque is my native district, in the welfare of its people I have ever felt the liveliest interest. They are in independent circumstances, and perhaps the most intelligent of any district in the Island. Some of them believe in Confederation, others do not ; while not a few regard it as a necessity. I rejoice myself, that I, as a native of that district, will soon see this Island a part of the Dominion, of the benefits of which Union, 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 225 Bedeque will participate, perhaps more largely than any other part of the Island. Such being my convictions, I would be glad if any hon. friends the representatives of that district, saw their way clear to support the resolution. I, therefore, move that the Address be agreed to. I feel pleased that an all but unanimous vote will be taken on this important question, and sorry that even one vote should appear upon our Records against it. (Applause.)
Mr. LAIRD.—I have much pleasure in seconding the resolution of the hon. member the Leader of the Government. I am happy to think that when we are about entering the Dominion, that we are likely to do so almost unanimously. I thought, some few years ago, that such would not be the case. But now we shall have notheing to complain of. The people are willing, and this House all but unanimous. (Hear.) We go in willingly. Not so  in Nova Scotia. That Province was forced in against the wish of the people, and as a result, it has been the source of much discontent and dissatisfaction. They said they were not  consulted, and that they were treated as if they had no right to have a voice in the matter. Such relfections cannot be cast upon the public men of this Colony. The late election was conducted principally with a view to ascertain the mind of the people upon this question. It would have been more agreeable to some, to have carried the measure without an appeal to the people, but I always contended for the reverse, and said, though I should stand alone, and never again occupy a seat in this House, I felt it my solemn duty to test the question at the polls. As a party, we were defeated, yet, nevertheless, the question has been sustained. In this House we are almost one in voting upon it, and I cannot but regard it as a happy era in the history of this Island, that such is the case. The whole question in all its aspects has been fairly and freely discussed. No advantage in any way has been taken of the people. We are now going into union with Canada at their desire, and with their free consent and concurrence. And even though the step we are now taking, should not prove advantageous to the interests of the people of this Island, they cannot throw any blame upon the Legislature for what it is now doing. But I fear no such results. On the contrary, as one, who for a long time opposed the measure, I rejoice that when we are entering, we do so under circumstances so satisfactory, and full of hope and promise. The Quebec Scheme did not contain Terms that were just to this Island. Those of 1869 were not such as we should have accepted ; they were not such as would have justified this Colony in surrendering up its constitution for. I am therefore, happy to see that the late delegates, in their correspondence with the Committee of the Privy Council did set some value upon our independent position. I am free now to admit that I do not fear any bad results from Confederation. The people in the other Provinces are as much afraid of taxation as we are. No increase of taxation can be levied upon us, but what must also be imposed upon them, therefore, in that respect we have nothing to fear. When at the time of the Quebec Conference we heard so much about the debt of old Canada, I felt there was very just grounds for apprehension and doubt. At that time, old Canada was, on their public securities, borrowing money at a discount of 7 1/2 per cent. while Nova Scotia paper went at par. But I am happy and glad to find that the history of old Canada in this respect, has not been repeated in that of the New Dominion. That taxation is actually decreasing, though the numbers of their public works are constantly increasing, and extending in magnitude and number from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 226 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 I rejoice, therefore, to see a prospect so bright before us, and of uniting with such a good, great and glorious country, and as the learned Atty. General once said that the same sun and rain shone and fell upoa the Dominion as what brightened and watered our little Island, so I hope and trust that the same blessings from on high may ever continue to shine and fall upon us and the people of this great Dominion. (Applause and cheers.)
Hon. Mr. HAVILAND.— I cannot, Mr. Speaker. sit and give a silent vote on the very important question now before this hon. House. We have tonight decided that we shall not longer continue to be a separate Colony. For my part, I am not a Confederate from circumstances of necessity, but from a long and sincere conviction that it will be for the general and permanent interests of this Island. I have been such from the date of the Quebec Conference, up to the present time. I saw that Cofederation, under the time honored old flag, was to prove a glorious success ; and firmly believe that our destinies would have been more prosperous if we had entered in 1864. But, because I then gave utterance to the conscientious convictions of my mind, I was looked upon as a traitor, and many thought I ought to have been hung up upon the nearest tree as a warning to public men. Yet, notwithstanding, I have never swerved from these principles. But while retaining these opinions, I was never an advocate of the policy that was practiced in Nova Scotia. To give a man a boon, unless it is appreciated, does him more harm than And so it would have been here if Confederation had been forced upon an unwilling people. But, now that an appeal has been made to our people, and the result shown in the vote this night given, we may reasonably conclude that our people appreciate the advantage of union with Canada; and that the action of this House tongiht will be fraught with much good to Prince Edward Island; and so far from realizing the evils dreaded by the hon. member for Bedeque (Mr. Howalt) it will be found that Confederation will confer blessings upon this Colony. No doubt it is a question that effects our interests for all time, but while this is the case. instead of cancelling our rights, as the hon. member seems to suppose, we are enlarging them, and by the vote this night given, have taken the first step to extend our privileges and increase our influence; so that in fact, our rights are only being enlarged. Although our population is but 100,000, or thereahouts, yet we are entering on terms which secures to us the advantages of a Colony much larger and more populous. Our peeple will become a portion of the Dominion which extends from the blue waters of the Atlantic, to the shores of the bright and Sparkling Pacific Ocean. Do you call that selling our rights? No. Is it putting your hand in a vice from which you cannot extricate it? Nothing of the kind. We are, and shall be, but enlarging and adding to our more expanding rights and privileges ass people. For disposing of all matters of ordinary interest, we shall still have our Local Legislature; and as for taxation, I believe we shall have nothing to fear from that scare crow which has been raised to frighten the timid. I believe that even the men who supported the ice-bound resolution. do not now dread that huge bugbear. It is also a matter for the most entire satisfaction, that the question should be carried as it has been to-night. To think that the. resolution. should be proposed by the Leader of the Government, and seconded by the Leader of the Opposition, is certainly a fact which cannot fail to be gratifying to every true friend of this Colony. We need not be afraid of our future destinies. We may be proud that we are to form part of a Dominion that 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 227 has a form of Government so superior to that of the United States. There they have. no responrible Government. The President, during his term of office, is literally invested with despotic powers. He is to all intents as much of a despot, for the term of four years, as any man can be. These are facts which cannot be contradicted. No matter what he may do, the people have, no constitutional means of getting rid of him untilhis term of office expires. But under our glorious constitution, the representatives of the people, when Parliament is assembled, can in one moment make or unmake a ministry. Long, long, therefore, may the Dominion continue to grow and prosper. Why, Sir, in the commerce of the world, the Dominion occupies no mean place, and to-day as rivals of the United States, her commerce is fully one-third that of the Great Republic. When such is the case now, what may we not hope and expect the future to be? We have no grounds then for misapprehension or doubt.
And let us be firm and united, One country. one flag for us all. United our strength will be freedom, Divided we each of us fall.
(Great applause and cheering.)
MR. P. SINCLAIR.—Sir, it would not be proper for me to give a silent vote on the present occasion. Perhaps I had as much to do in bringing about what we have agreed upon, and in what has called forth this Address, as any one here. I believe, if the late Government had not pursued the course it did, we would be called upon to levy an increase of taxation upon our people, which would create much discontent. In reviewing the past, I cannot but regard all the changes, which has taken place amongst, us within the past few years, as so many waves upon the sea, each one of which had a tendency to land this Colony into the haven of Confederation. We have had different Governments, yet each contributed tis share in working onward in one certain course, and now we are about dropping anchor in ,the harbor of the Dominion at the proper time. Figure aside. Had we not taken this course we would nowbe levying a tax ,of fifteen shillings upon every member of each family in the Island. Now I ask the hon. members from Bedeque whether the course now taken, or the one proposed by them, is likely to give the most satisfaction? I find no fault with them. They have a right to act as they feel duty demands. But representing a district as intelligent as Bedeque, they should have shown better reasons than they did, or have voted with the majority. Any hon. member, who will look fairly into the whole question, cannot fail to arrive at such a conclusion. In going into Confederation, we will have as much freedom as we now enjoy. We are but entering Into partnership with one of more influence and skill than we possess. For some years to come we will not require to increase our taxes, and supposing that in the course of seven or eight years we will require to raise $50,000, it will only amount to half a dollar a head. In the meantime see what an amount of commercial freedom we shall enjoy. The manufactures of Canada, which now pays duty of 15 per cent, will come in free. We will receive more than we give. We are uniting with a country that will manufacture all that we require. No argument which has been advanced in opposition to the course taken, meets the case. We leave the local Parliament in the possession of all its rights to deal with local questions. When the question is viewed from all sides fairly, it will be seen that we have taken the proper course. I have seriously considered the question, and am happy to see that we are so unanimous in this matter of union with Canada- I do also most sincerely hope 228 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 that from this but, that personalities in debate may cease. All such modes of arguing only lowers this hon. House. Let us see to it, that it is now done with. We will now have to take our stand in the Dominion, and I do most sincerely hope the Island will return men to the Commons, who, with credit to themselves and honor to this Colony, will be able to represent our interests in the Parliament of the Dominion. If so, I think we shall never have cause to regret the day we entered into union with a country so great as that of which we are so soon to form a part. (Applause.)
Hon. Mr. BRECKEN.—Mr. Speaker, I congratulate you, Sir, and this hon. House, on the happy and satisfactory manner in which this important question is being discussed and dealt with. I fully agree with the able and practical remarks of the hon. members who have preceded me. I believe, when we duly consider, that the manufacturers of Canada will fully keep pace with the growing wants of the Dominion. When we further think of the amount of manufactured goods which are annually imported hither, I think it will be seen that we are going to get more than we will give in return. I  feel happy that I am in accord with the Leader of the Opposition now on this question. I have been a Confederate for some time ; although a few years ago I believed it to be a question of Imperial, rather than one of Colonial policy. I felt that in the great and important public works of Canada, if I had a vote I would have cheerfully recorded it in their favor, believing, yes, knowing as I do, how rapidly they will contribute towards opening up the resources of that great country. I feel glad now too, that I recorded a vote in favor of our own Railway, and also for Confederation. Union with Canada will bind us more closely to the Mother Country, while I am sure it will add to our prosperity as a people. I am also sure, Sir, we are all glad to hear that in some respects she is going soon to rival the United States. The United States is perhaps the greatest country in the world. But they have forty millions of people, while Canada has but four or five millions. Yet, notwithstanding, in trade, commerce and manufactures, the latter country, in proportion to its population and existence, is vastly ahead of the United States. Every British subject should be a hearty Confederate. To be that now, is simply to be a loyal subject. Perhaps it is as well that we have been allowed our own way and time of joining with Canada. We have not married in haste. No doubt the hon. member the Leader of the Opposition has rendered good service in opposing the measure so long, and perhaps his position and the influences he brought to bear, has, more than anything else, contributed to the result now achieved. I thank him for going off to Canada ; congratulate him for pulling down his anti-Confederate flag ; and am glad he now sees in the public men of Canada, sufficient to admire to induce him to vote to cast in his lot with them. The conversion of the hon. member has been slow, but I doubt not it is sincere. (Laughter.) He did more when he went to Canada as a delegate, than when he went on with the Branch Lines to hasten on Confederation. I again thank him for the good services he has rendered in helping to make us a part and parcel of Canada. (Applause.)
Hon. Mr. SULLIVAN.—It is Sir, a satisfaction to know, that after all the angry debating which we have had, we have come to a unanimous resolution. Nor do I think we shall have any cause to regret the decision at which we have so happily arrived ; or to fear that any unpleasant consequences will result therefrom. In Confederation we will find that our advance on the road to prosperity will 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 229 not be hindered because of a union with Canada. On the contrary, I firmly believe that we shall soon make greater strides in that direction than we ever did. And Sir, after all, the change is not very great. In the Dominion, as British subjects, we shall rejoice to have responsible Government ever carried out in its purity. We shall then be represented by the ablest and best men which this Colony can send to the Canadian Parliament. I am of the opinion that the country will be satisfied that the best thing has been done for this Colony which their representatives had in their power to do. And of what we have this night done of our union with Canada, I think we shall never be ashamed. The Opposition fought the battle bravely, and yielded when it was graceful in them to do so. For my part I am quite willing to accord to the Leader of the Opposition credit for having very materially aided in bringing about that unanimity on this question, which we have this night witnessed. No doubt a great deal is due to him. I am glad to see the Opposition laying aside their fears, when our interest and destiny are uniting with those of the people of Canada. In the future I hope we shall unite our energies for the common good, and forget the angry discussions which we have had, and those acrimonious feelings which they gave rise to. (Cheers and applause.)
Mr. L. H. DAVIES.—Sir, it seems to have been the intention that this stage of the procedure should be a kind of peroration to the debate on Confederation. I have not been a Confederate for many months, but that is no reason why I should not unite in indulging in the good hopes and bright prospects which seem to loom up before hon. members. Still, I do not think we are entering a political El Dorado, where everything will be happy and glorious. I see that in the Dominion this year many elements which forbid the hope that such bright and glowing prospects are before us. So far the Dominion has been guided by men of no mean political order. As a result, their country, finances and credit, is year after year improving, and to-day they are fast building up a vast and widespread Empire. The change we are making will be found one that will not affect us greatly. This is the one hundredth year of our Parliamentary history as a separate Colony, and Sir, when I look up at the portraits of so many of those who have occupied the Speaker's chair within that time, some of whom are still living, and others who are not, I incline to believe if they were all here to-night, and had a voice in this Assembly, they would only be too happy to record a vote with us to-night. I will be glad, Sir, to see not only the hon. member the Leader of the Opposition, and all who support him, doing so too, but I would be happy also to see the hon. members for Bedeque casting in their vote also. We have had a time when differences of opinion were called for, and these brought forth quite enough of angry discussion ; but on this occasion I see no reason why we should not vote as one man. (Hear.) Considering our  position as a Colony in the past, I find that our prospecity has increased at a ratio which will compare favorably with any part of Canada. That each seven years marks an increase in our wealth, which reflects credit upon our Island. Our people have, under the free system of education we possess, sent forth many of their sons to occupy places of honor in the world, and have embraced and improved at home the advantages it confers, as much as they have in any part of Canada. We have a better class of farming people, and a better informed people than they have in many parts of the Dominion. I therefore feel that we are able to take our stand in the position which we shall have to occupy and maintain to 230 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 our advantage. And while I look back with deep feelings on the happy years of the past, I rejoice to know that I can look forward to an equally happy and prosperous future. Yes, Mr. Speaker, I feel inclined to look forward to the high political calling which is set before us, and to which we smcalled in the Dominion of Canada. (Laughter and applause.)
Mr. HOWATT.—Why Mr. Speaker one would think in listening to these, hon. members, that the political millenium of the world had arrived. (Laugter.) But Sir, I do not think we are justified in hearkening to such sudden converts to Confederation. [Hear.] Let us take a common sense view of the subject. In the United States they have a population of forty millions, and I maintain we are but a unit when placed beside that that great country. Hon. members have said that we will be under the old flag. I would like to know if we are not under it now? Are we not already under the protection and connected with the the greatest nation in the world? I am not one of those who feel dissatisfied with this connection, nor with the protection Great Britain extends to us. This great Dominion of which we hear so much, will, before long, be separated from Great Britain and thrown upon its own resources, and I see nothing pleasing to such a prospect. Why in the event of such a result, the probability is that it will fall into the hands of the United States. The greater the Dominion becomes, the less disposed it will be to submit to the dictation of the Home country. Her statesmen will want to chalk out acourse of their own. Our young may be called out to fight against those who have been our friends; and as regards our trade, we have no market in the Dominion for what our country produces. We will, in the Dominion, even as now a have to look to some other place for a remunerative market for what we will have to sell. I believe the day will come when we will have to pay a higher duty, than we would if we should now resolve to retain our constitution, and continue to paddle our own canoe. I know, Mr. Speaker that in this House, I occupy about the same position that our representatives will to the Dominion Parliament. They will be left out and have their news treated in the same way as mine are here. I maintain it is the privilege and duty of every hon. member to assert his rights and state his views. That I have done, and believe I have been much more consistent in doing so than the hon. member the Leader of the Opposition has been. Will the hon. member tell us that he will go up and be at the nod and beck of the leading men of Canada? If he goes up there he will, no doubt, watch which way the majority will go, and govern himself accordingly. I, for one, believe in a men taking a stand for himself, and not watching how others go, and then following their shadows. But such is the position of the hon. member, and such also will be the position of those whom we may send to Ottawa. Two votes here, is a larger minority than six will be in the Dominion House of Commons. I have for several years represented a district, which, for wealth and intelligence, is second to none, save Charlottetown, in the Islmd. The electors decided against Confederation, and I would look upon myself as a traitor, were I to vote against my promise to them.
Hon. Mr. POPE.—Sir, I would like to see my hon. friend supporting the motion on the present occasion. Both of the hon. members should be satisfied in having continued their opposition to the present moment. They can effect nothing by opposing the Address, but should remember, that in view of what has already been so unanimously agreed to, it is disrespect 1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 231 ful to oppose the motion that an Address be presented to the Queen's Representative. I hope they will reconsider the matter, and not vote against the Address. I am pleased, Mr. Speaker, to see the good feeling that is existing when a vote so im: portant is about to be recorded on our journals. The fact is, whatever our former or present differences have been, or are, we are all too patriotic to record our vote otherwise than for the Address, rejoicing, as we all do, in the bright future which looms up before us. [Applause]
MR. HOLLAND.— Sir, most heartily do I congratulate the Government in the success of their delegates in obtaining better Terms. Still I am not satisfied that it is my duty to support the motion. We have heard several speeches, but no reason has been produced, save the glory argument, to show why we should support Confederation. I would like to see it shown from historical facts which can be relied on as correct, that the union of a small isolated Colony like ours, with a great and large country, has been of advantage to the former. History, on the contrary, abundantly proves, that whenever a small country becomes united to a larger, its prosperity ceases to increase proportionate with that of the larger country. Such has been the case in the union of Scotland and Ireland with England. The smaller country has to hear her full proportion of the burdens, but seldom participates in the general advantages. The Leader of the Opposition presumes to advise my hon. colleague and myself, and sat we had better now submit. I have often noticed that when the leader of a flock of sheep runs, the sheep follow; but I can assure the hon. member I have no idea of following so erratic a guide as he is. What is the situation of affairs now in New Brunswick? That Province is almost ready to take up arms. I saw a man from thence, who said, be exerted himself to the utmost to carry Confederation in that Province, but that if he had the same duty to discharge again, he would rather cut off his arm than exert it in favor of a union with Canada. Here the education question has been resorted to as a lever to push us in; in that Province the Fenian raid was used as a means to frighten the people into an acceptance of union with the Dominion. That the late Government party made use of the School Question to accomplish similiar results, cannot be successfully denied, and were it not for that question, a much larger vote would have been recorded against Confederation. I have no hesitation in saying this. The Leader of the Opposition tells us that we are, by going into the Dominion, only enlarging and adding to our rights and privileges. I see matters in a different light. We are simply giving up to the Dominion the greatest privileges any people ever possessed. We enjoy the sole right of making our own laws, of taxing ourselves as we see fit, and spending these when collected, as he may deem proper; and all these blessings and privileges we are surrendering simply for the glory of becoming a part of a great country. Yet the greatness of Canada is more in the extent of her territory, than in anything else. The greater portion of her wide domain is yet a wilderness. True her public works are in excess of those of any other country, according to her pepulation, and her debt will soon be in the same proportion. Yet hon. members speak as if we were going into Paradise. But what are the facts? We export more and import more, according to our population, than any part of the Dominion. This is an incontrovertible fact. We send more children to school, and mail more letters, in proportion to the number of our people, than in any part of Canada. The Leader of the Opposition took the 232 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 1873 trouble to say the same sun shone and the same rain fell on Canada as here, but the hon. member ought to know that they fall also upon the Hottentots in Africa and the people of Asia as well. In the district my hon. colleague and myself represent, there are men of wealth and intelligence, who look upon Confederation with great suspicion. Some are in favor of it, but not many. Have our resources been tried ? They have not. No  effort has been made in any shape or form, but an effort for terms of union. Yet I hope and trust that the hopes and expectations indulged in, may be fully realized. We were told about the factories of the Dominion, but not one word has been said about our own. The 15 per cent tariff, which operated as a protection, will be removed ; and if they can manufacture goods in the other Provinces cheaper than we can here, our factories will go down. We have sold our noble little ship. She now stands stripped of all the glory with which for one hundred years she was adorned. If we were not ice-bound, our circumstances might be different, and our little barque might long continue to float. But such being our fate, I hope that in the future our prospects and successes may improve, and that no devious course may mark the career of those who may lead our destinies.
Hon. Mr. LEFURGY.—Mr. Speaker, for my part I have, for the last ten years, looked upon this question with favor. In running my election, I have had it brought up against me, but now, I am happy to be able to say that my hon. colleague and myself can vote for this question, with the full consent of our constituents. The hon. member who last addressed you, Sir, said that when a small country united with a larger, it never obtained its rights. I believe the reverse to be the fact. If you look to the United States, such will not be found to be the case. Nor would that country or its people to-day be as great and prosperous as they are, had they not united as they did ? Our country is small enough, nor is it by retaining our isolation, but by merging our interests with a larger country, that our prosperity is to be enhanced. I know many of our people believe that we will be better off by entering the Dominion ; while some think our best course is to remain as we are. But I believe, before ten years roll round, it will be seen that we have this night acted wisely for the interests of this Colony. In future the politics of this country will be carried on differently to what they have been. I believe in proportion to our population,that we have more men among us, in proportion to our number, who can take their stand in the Dominion Parliament, in a creditable manner, than they have in any Province of Canada. When I know that such is the case, I have no fears that our interests will be overlooked. I am sorry that the junior member for Bedeque cannot unite with us on this occasion. But I believe that before twelve months go round both he and his constituents will not be of the opinion they are now. Knowing, Mr. Speaker, that at this hour of the morning you must be tired, I shall not further tresspass on your time.
The question was then put and carried on the following division :—
Yeas—Hons. Mr. Pope, Howlan, McEachen, Kelly, Lefurgy, Haviland, Brecken, Sullivan, Davies ; Messrs. Owen, T. Kelly, Arsneault, James Yeo, John Yeo, A. C. McDonald, McLean, McIsaac, Laird, Callbeck, McNeill, Rowe, Beer, Sinclair, Steward, L. H. Davies.
Nays—Mr. Howatt, Holland.
Ordered, That the said Address be engrossed.
1873 PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER. 233
Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to prepare an Address to His Honor the Lieut. Governor, praying that His Honor will be pleased to forward the preceding Address to be laid at the foot of the Throne.
Ordered, That the same Committee who prepared the Address to Her Majesty, be a Committee to prepare the said Address to His Honor.
The House having continued to sit until after 12 of the o'clock on Tuesday morning, adjourned until 10 o'clock to-day.
G.

Source:

The Parliamentary Reporter of Debates and Proceedings of the House of Assembly. Charlottetown: Henry Cooper, 1873. Microfilm copies provided by the Prince Edward Island Libraries and Archives.

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Selection of input documents and completion of metadata: Isabelle Carré-Hudson.

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